Dupont Circle Restaurants

Komi

1509 17th St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-332-9200

American
Greek

 

$$$$$
$135.00*
 

★★★★

Poor Value

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★★★★

Poor Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
James Beard Award winner Johnny Monis originally opened Komi as a casual neighborhood restaurant. Although it retains the casual vibe, it has evolved into a true culinary destination. A $135 chef's tasting includes just one option: diners select a family-style main course for the table (in addition to the restaurant's signature roasted goat, lamb, suckling pig, and branzino are frequent options). The entree is preceded by a numerous one or two bite small dishes, including several excellent raw fish crudos, and followed by multiple dessert courses. The result is a leisurely affair, full of surprises and comfort in equal measure.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
4 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015 [9]
"Hate surprises? Consider a restaurant other than Komi, the modern Greek restaurant from Johnny Monis and his wife, Anne Marler, in Dupont Circle. All you’ll be asked at the outset is if you have allergies or restrictions (the kitchen can handle them) and whether you want wine pairings for an extra $70 a person (just nod yes). Beyond that, you’re simply told to expect some little bites followed by bigger ones and invited to relax and let the restaurant take care of you. That Komi does — exquisitely — for the next several hours. One-bite wonders, many involving fish, swim to the table…. Louder than I remember it at peak hours, the spare, sponge-yellow dining room hasn’t changed much since Komi opened in 2003; the restaurant pours all its effort into feeding you, body and soul — a four-star priority." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 2 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"How a room of such quiet minimalism can feel so warm and embracing is among the dining scene’s enduring mysteries. But that’s Komi’s magic, no tricks required. The seeming effortlessness of the pacing is a credit to one of the region’s best staffs, a group of earnest folks expert in reading tables and moods, who don’t merely keep the water glasses filled but—corny as it sounds—endeavor to make memories. Johnny Monis’s cooking—nominally Mediterranean but drawing on a range of global influences—never fails to surprise, and not just because the absence of a menu keeps you from knowing what’s coming. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Bold — Superlative
"Johnny Monis is a genius belatedly becoming a superstar, Komi is one of the best overall dining experiences in the Washington area."

Little Serow

1511 17th St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
No Phone

Thai


 

$$
$45.00*
 

★★★★

Excellent Value

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★★★★

Excellent Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This small restaurant from the owners and in the basement of the four-star Komi features Isan cooking inspired by chef Johnny Monis' travels in the northeastern region of Thailand. There are no reservations, no menu, and no substitutions here (not even for allergies), and everything is served family-style (even soup). Vegetarians are, essentially, not welcome. Still, diners queue for over an hour before it opens promptly at 5:30 for a chance at one of the 30 seats. Those that don't get in on the first seating go on the waiting list, sometimes waiting an additional three or four hours for a table (if they get in at all). But those lucky enough to get in are treated to one of the best dining bargains anywhere, a steal at $45 per person.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
4 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015 [4]
"Yes, you’ll probably have to wait in line if you want to eat during the first seating, and, no, the kitchen can’t accommodate fussy eaters. Little Serow packs heat, meat and nuts into its menu, just as cooks all across Northern Thailand do. The payoff — for standing outside, for an adventurous palate — is eight or so courses of food that’s 'spicy and loud,' as our enthusiastic server explains, pointing out that the basket of herbs and a pouch of sticky rice are there to refresh the palate and swab sauces. y companion, a novice to the strangely green basement venue from Johnny Monis, the chef-owner of the neighboring Komi, can’t stop smiling. 'Everyone is so NICE here!' …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 3 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"If you’ve been to Johnny Monis and Anne Marler’s English basement turned Thai restaurant in the last couple of years, you’ll likely be familiar with many of the plates on the seven-dish family-style menu. But like a band deep into its tour, the set list has become tighter and the chords more masterful, even if the songs are well known. The fabled fieriness has been finely tuned, too. Rather than making diners beg for palate-soothing glasses of full-fat milk from the start, the spicing now slowly builds, crescendoes (with a sweat-inducing tofu salad), then abates with a plate of mild pork ribs marinated with Mekong whiskey and strewn with dill. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"After three visits, my advice to DC diners is this: remember these days when the restaurant (which is worth $100) was priced at $45."

Obelisk

2029 P St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-872-1180

Italian


 

$$$$
$75.00*
 

★★★

Average Value

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★★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Peter Pastan's long-running, prix fixe Italian restaurant is decidedly old-school (there's no website, for example). The menu features a series of excellent antipasti that tend to overshadow the mains that follow but not the desserts, which are top-notch. A good wine list, attentive service, and intimate setting round out the package.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015
"Restaurants that don’t change typically do so at their peril. If there’s an exception, it’s Obelisk, humming along after 28 years and more or less doing what it has always done: putting out some of the best Italian food in the city. Forgive me if you’ve heard this before, but here goes: Try not to fill up on the antipasti … a spread as abundant as it is amazing. Pasta will have you competing with the dishwasher to wipe the plate clean…. A pleasant surprise: Entrees are now the equal of the other four courses on the $75 menu.…" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 35 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Today’s dining scene often favors the adventurous (edible insects!), so there’s much that’s deeply pleasurable about Peter Pastan’s 29-year-old tasting room. Tricks are few—plates of burrataare set out for maximum room-temperature creaminess—and hassles are none, thanks to a poised waitstaff who leisurely pace the five-course meal. Linger over the antipasti (also a Pastan strong suit at 2Amys and Etto), the generous wine pairings, and the pastas, such as house-made noodles with squid. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A civilized dining room, good antipasti, bread, wine, and desserts, main courses have disappointed me in recent years."

The Riggsby

1731 New Hampshire Ave NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-787-1500

American


 

$$$
$27.86
 

★★★

Average Value

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★★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The newest outpost from Boston chef Michael Schlow is nothing like his first DC restaurant, Tico. The Riggsby ditches the Latin theme in favor of a homage to the cuisine of yesteryear. The menu features modern takes on classics, many of which haven't been seen on restaurant menus in this town for decades.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/4/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015 [6]
"… I could imagine drinking only seltzer and having a good time of it, although the Riggsby’s daiquiris and Sazeracs — generous, well-made drinks — are more in keeping with the retro theme dreamed up by Boston chef Michael Schlow and executed by Philippe Reininger, formerly of the late J&G Steakhouse. Some dishes come with a wink: Potato tots lined up like Rockettes on a ripple of chipotle aioli and sporting chili rings are closer to haute cuisine than a freezer case. Other choices update the tried and true. If you’re looking for a stellar chopped salad, plate of spaghetti or chocolate cake, this is where you can call off the search. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 28 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Hidden in a hotel that resembles your average Dupont Deco apartment building is a keyhole-shaped doorway. Walk through and you’ll discover a place that transports you, Wes Anderson–style, to another time. The dining room looks late-’70s swank and celebrates cocktail-party relics such as the stuffed mushroom and the Harvey Wallbanger. But chef/owner Michael Schlow, also behind Tico in Logan Circle and a handful of well-regarded Boston-area restaurants, isn’t operating strictly within the realm of the nostalgic here. He and deputy Philippe Reininger also put forth lovely fish dishes …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Fairly overrated by the press, The Riggsby's executive chef is spreading himself thinly, only time will tell whether or not the initial quality holds." See 8/6/2015 Review…»

Sushi Taro

1503 17th St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-462-8999

Japanese
Sushi

 

$$$$
$45.00
 

★★½

Poor Value

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★★½

Poor Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The neighborhood nearly rioted when Nobu Yamazaki remade his casual sushi joint above a CVS drugstore into a high-end sushi parlor. But the result is the best, most interesting sushi to be had in the city. If money is no object, book a seat at the six stool sushi counter in the back for the full $140 omakase experience. For something a bit more gentle on the wallet, get the $45 "omakase sushi" dinner (buried mid-menu), which features the best fish available that day, much of it flown in from Japan. Also don't miss the excellent small plates, which make excellent pre-sushi appetizers.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/9/2014) — Fall Dining Guide 2014
"There are two ways to experience this second-floor, honey-hued Japanese restaurant near Dupont Circle. One is to open a menu and eat at a table.…A second strategy involves opening your mind and letting chef Nobu Yamazaki make the decisions at his six-stool, white oak counter in the rear of the restaurant. Omakase (“chef’s choice”) is not an inexpensive proposition. The meter for the meal starts at $140 a person. But the seats — and the chef’s attention — are yours for the duration of the night, and nowhere else do the hours pass as serenely as they do in this hushed setting. …[F]or Japan to feel any closer, you’d have to be hoisting chopsticks in Tokyo." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 46 (1/8/2015) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2015
"The second-floor dining room is as hushed as a day spa—only the tinkling fountains, the scentless candles, and the New Age music are missing. The staff, on the other hand, plays its part perfectly, with an ethereal quietness that makes you feel bad for speaking above a whisper. The best meals are to be had by ordering heavily, if not exclusively, from the daily list of fish specials. Or opt for one of chef Nobu Yamazaki’s kaiseki, or tasting, menus, which embody the time-honored virtues of Japanese cooking—harmony, balance, color, delicacy, and pacing. And, not least, deliciousness." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A new, upscale version of Sushi Taro is much more expensive, with very good, hard-to-source sushi. A serious candidate for upgrade in rank."

Hank's Oyster Bar

1624 Q Street NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-462-4265

Seafood


 

$$
$23.17
 

★★½

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This fun local favorite has branches in Dupont and Alexandria. This one is the original and features a lively bar up front and separate — and excellent — raw bar in the back. Besides the raw bar, simply prepared, classic seafood dishes like fried whole belly clams tend to be best here.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
1.5 Stars (10/23/2011)
Tom Sietsema found growing pains when he visited the expanded original in 2011, but the kitchen has grown into its new space and returned to the form that made it a local favorite. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 65 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"When you tire of restaurant “concepts” and of servers who need to “explain” the menu to you, keep in mind Jamie Leeds’s convivial oyster houses—your antidote to trendy pretense. But why think only oppositionally? Hank’s is also pretty great for a light meal after a movie, or when you happen to have brought together a group of varying tastes and needs and find yourself desperate. The selection of oysters changes daily, the clam chowder rings true, the po’ boys overflow with beautifully fried shrimp and oysters, and the crabcakes (at a time, unfortunately, of diminishing returns on the scene) are reliably light and sweet. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

DGS Delicatessen

1317 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-293-4400

Jewish
Delicatessen

 

$$
$17.13
 

★★

Good Value

MORE INFO

★★

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
DGS is a "deli" in name only — it's really a full service restaurants serving modern takes on Jewish deli food. Although opening chef Barry Koslow has departed, DGS is flourishing under his replacement Brian Robinson. In fact, it may be getting better — trimming the menu to play to the restaurant's strengths and offering more generous portions of the exceptional pastrami and corned beef. It's also a great option for brunch.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/10/2013) — Fall Dining Guide 2013
"DGS is no standard-issue deli. For starters, the Dupont Circle outpost comes with a bar. Further, the kitchen is more respectful than reverential regarding tradition." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 30 (1/8/2015) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2015
"Maybe it’s time to stop thinking of this deli as just a deli and start thinking of it as one of the best in a crop of ambitious, midlevel restaurants to hit Washington in recent years. It would be hard to name more than a handful of places where you can eat or drink so well, and at such decent-for-DC prices. ... Which isn’t to say don’t go for the luscious pastrami (sliced in the manner of Montreal’s smoked meat, as opposed to the thinner cut favored by New York delis) or the finest chopped chicken liver around—just that you can settle in and make a night of it (manager Brian Zipin mixes a great cocktail). If you want, you can skip the canonical dishes entirely and tuck into a strapping plate of chicken schnitzel with whipped potatoes and braised red cabbage." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"An important new restaurant with great drinks, and the only truly great deli the DC area has had since Carnegie Deli first opened in Tysons." See 1/9/2013 Review…»

Nazca Mochica

1633 P Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-733-3170

Peruvian


 

$$
$22.17
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This two-story restaurant in the old Heritage India space has a ground floor ceviche bar, Mochica, and a fine dining restaurant on the second floor, Nazca. The Peruvian cooking from chef Roberto Castre, who also owns a restaurant in Houston, is among the finest examples of the chef's native cuisine in the area.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (5/11/2016) — Spring 2016 Dining Guide
"Proof that Shaw doesn’t have all the fun: this two-story Peruvian oasis in Dupont Circle. Upstairs (Nazca) is a minimalist dining room with a brief but compelling menu, a mix of Peruvian standards (causitas, lomo saltado) and novelties including duck confit over which a tangy marinade is added at the table. Downstairs (Mochica) is a seviche lounge and a bar whose street snacks, pisco sours and handsome design conspire to turn after-work drinks into a full-fledged feast. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Al Tiramisu

2014 P St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-467-4466

Italian


 

$$$
$26.00
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This thoroughly Italian restaurant offers solid, classic cooking in a charming basement setting. The rare quiet restaurant, it's a great date spot, with charismatic servers and an old-school, formal approach. But beware, some of the specials can be disproportionately expensive, so don't be bashful and ask for prices before you order.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (5/18/2013) — 2013 Spring Dining Guide
Tom Sietsema revisits Al Tiramisu and finds that owner Luigi Diotaiuti's "joyful Italian" restaurant has remained consistently good over time. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (5/1/2002)
Washingtonian's last review of Al Tiramisu is more than a decade old. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Deceptively upscale Italian, homemade pastas, my most recent meal here was great, good bread and olive tapenade, specials can be expensive." See 10/24/2012 Review…»

Pesce

2002 P St. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-466-3474

Seafood
French

 

$$$
$26.50
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Regine Palladin's long-running, casual restaurant is a dependable choice for great fish prepared in a decidedly European style.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (5/7/2008)
A very outdated review of the venerable seafood restaurant in West Dupont, which has since moved to its current location but is still small and casual with a chalkboard menu and a tiny bar. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Good, reliable seafood prepped in a European aesthetic, my last three visits have been fantastic, disappointing, and very good."

Bethesda Bagels

1718 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-299-9399

Bagels


 

$
$6.59
 

Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

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Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Although a fairly typical bagel shop in most respects, Bethesda Bagels is a cut above the rest. We note there's a credible whitefish salad available, an unfortunate rarity around DC.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

The Washington Post has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A New York-styled bagelry, boiled, then baked."

Glen's Garden Market

2001 S St NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-588-5698

American
Sandwiches
Pizza
 

$
$9.00
 

Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Danielle Vogel's upscale market, which focuses on local products, also has a casual bar with an excellent selection of the region's best craft beer and wine. The menu comes from chef Travis Olson, who previously worked at world famous Noma. It features sandwiches and pizzas made with the same great produce and meats sold in the store. There are also a few outdoor tables.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

The Washington Post has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (5/5/2016) — Cheap Eats 2016
"Eating local and eating cheap rarely go hand in hand, which is why environmental lawyer turned grocer Danielle Vogel keeps prices modest for the prepared foods at her two markets. (“You can’t spread the word if no one walks in the door.”) Start at the bar, where craft drafts are always $4 and can be paired with superb sourdough-crust pizzas (Dupont location only) or ultra-gooey grilled cheeses and shared around tables inside and out. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell has not reviewed this restaurant.

Sweetgreen

1512 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-387-9338

Salads
Healthy

 

$
$9.90
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This rapidly-expanding local chain with locations in the DC area, New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, offers healthy, good-quality salads. With its emphasis on fresh, local ingredients and calories posted on the menu, it's one of our picks for healthy "cheap eats."
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

The Washington Post has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (12/1/2007)
The last word from Washingtonian is this badly outdated review of the original Georgetown location. The chain has expanded up the East Coast and hosts a yearly music festival. But it still follows the same basic format: salads and yogurt, featuring local ingredients and numerous toppings. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Chop't Creative Salad Company

1300 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-327-2255

Salads
Wraps
Healthy
 

$
$9.99
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This small salad chain with locations in New York and DC is a great spot for a quick salad or salad wrap. You can make your own combination or select from a number of tasty pre-selected ones. And, with the calories posted on the menu and a good selection of "spa" dressings (all under 50 calories per serving), it's one of our picks for healthy "cheap eats."
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (11/18/2012)
The story about Chop’t highlights some of what we like about it: it’s healthy, fast, has a wide variety of ingredients to choose from, and offers a number of tasty combinations. But that's only half of what caught the reporter's eye. "The other half is the theater that comes with the salad assembly line." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell has not reviewed this restaurant.

Teaism

2009 R Street NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-667-3827

Asian


 

$
$10.70
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
These Asian-inspired tea houses feature simple, good food and small selection of beer and wine alongside an extensive menu of teas. Don't miss the salted oat cookies, easily worth purchasing a whole bag.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (11/30/2008)
An outdated review of Teaism's breakfast, but we still agree with its recommendation of "scrambled eggs with tea-smoked salmon or chicken sausage with nan and raita." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (12/14/2009)
This outdated review still holds true: "the food is fast, healthy, cheap, and tasty," featuring eclectic "Bento Boxes" at lunch and, of course, tea. And definitely "don't forget those salty oat cookies." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"These tea houses are treasures, the food is simple and good, try the salted oat cookie with your tea."

BGR: The Burger Joint

1514 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-299-1071

Burgers


 

$
$14.93
 

Cheap Eats
Good Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
BGR has expanded nationally, but it all started here in DC. The burgers are big, juicy, and cooked to order -- basically everything you could want in a burger joint.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (10/17/2010)
This outdated review notes "prime, aged, hormone-free" beef "on a toasted sesame-seeded brioche bun," fries "made with Yukon Gold potatoes" and "shakes are so thick, they’re easier to eat with a spoon than a straw." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/1/2014) — Cheap Eats 2014
"Beef Wellington—that pastry-wrapped staple of ’50s dinner parties—is the inspiration for this rock ’n’ roll burger chain’s behemoth ($8.99). The dry-aged patty is grilled, then laden with sautéed mushrooms and onions, plus loads of blue cheese. It’s probably the most elegant thing you’ll ever eat while surrounded by Journey album covers." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"No longer under the original management, but if you stick with the basic hamburger, it's cooked to the specified temperature, and is surprisingly delicious." See 12/9/2015 Review…»
Ratings Guide:
★★★★ Extraordinary;  ★★★ Excellent;  ★★ Good;  ★ Average
All restaurants listed rate above-average or better. DCDiningGuide.com also includes a number of unrated local favorites, casual places, and other restaurants that we recommend if you’re in the neighborhood.
Price Guide:
$$$$$ Unlimited (>$45); $$$$ Very Expensive ($35-$45); $$$ Expensive ($25-$35); $$ Moderate ($15-$25); Inexpensive (<$15)
Price is based on the average cost of a dinner entree, which generally reflects a third of the cost of a full meal. Please note, however, that appetizer and beverage prices vary widely. Tasting menus are indicated with an asterisk (*).