Gallery Place/Chinatown Restaurants

Proof

775 G St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-737-7663

American
Wine Bar

 

$$$
$28.70
 

★★★

Good Value

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★★★

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Proof is perhaps the most versatile restaurant in the city. While the wine bar is a perfect place to meet for a drink and a light meal, Chef Haidar Karoum's dining room is among the area's best destinations for a big night out. This versatility owes to a menu with tremendous variety, with a full page of cheese and charcuterie, another page of small plates, and around ten entree choices. There's also an extensive, well-chosen wine list with a large selection available by the glass, and excellent cocktails. A $75 chef's tasting menu is also available, $115 with the optional wine pairing.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/18/2009)
"Here's my fallback for any number of restaurant scenarios. When friends ask where they should go for drinks, Proof and its excellent wine and spirits program leap to mind. (My refresher of choice: tequila, white port and chartreuse.) When strangers want to know what's hot but not too expensive, I tell them that the average dinner entree in this light-by-day, dim-by-night leather-and-brick playground is $25. When visiting foodies ring me up, I'll frequently introduce them to Proof." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 15 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Steadiness is not one of the sexier virtues in the restaurant world. But settle into this dark-lit lair and you’ll appreciate what so many flashy newcomers lack: a maturity and poise that are evident at the outset, with a warm welcome and expert cocktails. It’s a wine bar, but without the preciousness of many others in the genre—a testament to the haimish sensibility of late owner Mark Kuller as well as the fact that it sits steps away from the Verizon Center. Haidar Karoum’s menu suits a range of needs and tastes. You can graze on cheeses and charcuterie, colorful salads, and flatbreads, or delve into a tasting menu of plates that blend rusticity with refinement. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A sleek atmosphere, charismatic staff (too many to name), talented chef, and vibrant bar crowd." See 12/3/2010 Review…»

Zaytinya

701 Ninth St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-638-0800

Turkish
Lebanese
Greek
 

$$
$25.00
 

★★★

Good Value

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★★★

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Jose Andres' Middle Eastern restaurant (named for the Turkish word for "olive oil") is as good as ever under Chef Michael Costa. There's no better place in the city to experience Turkish, Greek, and Lebanese flavors, which work well in Andres' signature small plates format. All of the classics are here, each presented in a modern style that manages not to lose what we all love about the traditional preparations. There's also a good, esoteric wine list featuring numerous Middle Eastern selections that pair well with the food.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/9/2014) — Fall Dining Guide 2014
"No matter your pleasure, this kitchen aims to meet it, with dozens of dishes that ferry you to Greece, Lebanon and Turkey without your having to leave Penn Quarter.…My current interests at Zaytinya run all over the map.…Hate making decisions? Let chef Michael Costa whip up an “Experience,” five or so courses for $55. The blue of the expansive dining room brings the sea to mind, while the white, which is everywhere else, suggests drifting clouds or sun-washed rock. Chipped furnishings give away the restaurant’s age (12), but diners might be too busy knocking back ouzo-battered trout or chicken shawarma to notice, or care." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 55 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"It’s been 14 years since José Andrés opened his Mediterranean mezze house, though you wouldn’t guess it from the crowds that still pack the lofty space. Chef de cuisine Michael Costa keeps palates engaged with the roster of creative Greek, Turkish, and Lebanese dishes. The menu of more than 60 small plates can make for a generous or slightly uneven dining experience, depending on how you order, though real misfires are rare and tables can forgo decision-making altogether and opt for the chef’s tasting ($55 a person). …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A food factory, but people love it here, good esoteric wines, and an outstanding cocktail program run by Alex Strange (have him make you a Gimlet!)."

Daikaya Ramen

705 Sixth St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-589-1600

Japanese
Ramen

 

$
$12.65
 

★★½

Exceptional Value

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★★½

Exceptional Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Chef Katsuya Fukushima left the ultra-high-end Minibar to open this dual ramen shop and izakaya with partners Yama Jewayni and Daisuke Utagawa. The ramen shop is a spare, buzzy space with an open kitchen that serves up some of the best ramen in DC. Five different broths are offered: shio, shoyu, mugi-miso, spicy miso, and vegetable, each featuring noodles imported from Sapporo, Japan. A number of add-ins are also offered, including an excellent chashu roast pork.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/10/2013) — Fall Dining Guide 2013
"There are two ways to experience this restaurant across from Verizon Center. Soup nuts stay on the ground floor to sip the broth and slurp the noodles of Sapporo-style ramen in a spare, 40-seat shop. Soup nuts stay on the ground floor to sip the broth and slurp the noodles of Sapporo-style ramen in a spare, 40-seat shop." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 66 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Expect hour waits—even at lunch—for this 40-seat ramen shop across from the Verizon Center. Here’s why: In a city awash in ultra-porky tonkatsu ramen, chef Katsuya Fukushima’s lighter Sapporo-style soups offer more variety and nuance than the competition. Customers hunker on box-like benches, sipping beer to the tune of Jay-Z and a constant sizzling from the kitchen’s woks, which sear vegetables or add a roasted flavor to broth swirled in the pan. You won’t go wrong with any of the five styles of ramen …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A wonderful, hipster ramen house, with giant vats of broth in an open kitchen, try the Mugi-Miso with butter and an egg."

Momofuku CCDC

(CityCenter DC)
1090 I St NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-602-1832

Asian


 

$$
$18.33
 

★★½

Good Value

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★★½

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
In the years since David Chang started the ramen and steamed bun revolution in New York, DC residents have been eagerly waiting for the day the Alexandria native would return home. The result is a restaurant that hits most of Chang's greatest hits without being wedded to the format, allowing for a few DC-only dishes.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (1/13/2016)
"… [T]he shrimp buns at Momofuku CCDC needed to deliver. In truth, they rock. … Carbs, including a peppery noodle soup bobbing with beef short ribs and bok choy, are your friends here. … So are the breezy servers, who win you over … with the kind of knowledge that leads you to believe they sat in on cooking lessons by the opening chefs, Patrick Curran and Mark Gears. … Meanwhile, the ramen of choice teams snappy noodles in a mushroom broth with a mass of kale and a crisp garnish of crooked chickpea crackers waving from the bowl. … Lest anyone think Chang, 38, is simply replaying his oldies but goodies, Momofuku CCDC has added to its brief opening repertoire a number of dishes unique to the District. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 52 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"No restaurant opening of 2015 was more anticipated than this spinoff of David Chang’s Momofuku brand. It would be hard for any restaurant to live up to such immense expectations, particularly an outpost of empire with an absentee chef/owner. And while there are dishes that will have you marveling at Chang’s ability to make fast food feel like fine dining, you’ll also encounter the rough edges endemic to high-volume operations where the boss isn’t always looking—a dish that needs more fine-tuning, a presentation that comes across as more tossed off than labored upon. But Chang, a Northern Virginia native, is often maniacal in his quest for perfection. So keep an eye on the place over the coming year …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Restaurateur David Chang's wildly popular New York chain, surprisingly good Pan-Asian (for its size), Loud, boisterous communal atmosphere, Hyped and well-marketed."

Centrolina

(CityCenterDC)
974 Palmer Alley NW
Washington, DC 20268
202-898-2426

Italian


 

$$$
$29.00
 

★★½

Average Value

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★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This new Italian restaurant at the ultra-luxe CityCenterDC development is from Chef Amy Brandwein and is fast becoming known for its delicious pastas. Brandwein learned her skill with noodles cooking for years under renowned chef Roberto Donna at Alba Osteria and Galileo. But pasta is not the only reason to go — the charred octopus appetizer and porchetta entree, for example, have also been getting rave reviews.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (12/16/2015)
"… Amy Brandwein, 45, a disciple of Roberto Donna with a lower profile … ventured out on her own this spring with a combination restaurant and market. … One side is a tidy dining room with an intimate bar, white-washed brick walls, splashes of teal and cubbies for the wood used to fire Centrolina’s oven. The rest of the space hosts display cases of … fish and … meat, bins of citrus and mushrooms, refrigerated meals to go and more than a few designer labels. … Multiple meals over several months at Centrolina reveal a kitchen that impresses diners less with a trademark than with select ingredients that haven’t been manipulated beyond recognition. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 69 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Remember the name Roberto Donna? The Italian chef, once revered in Washington, has largely faded from view. But a generation of chefs apprenticed under his watchful gaze, among them his most recent protégé, Amy Brandwein, who learned more than a thing or two about pasta making. Let other chefs send out the expected tagliatelle and chittarra—Brandwein’s lineup includes such obscurities as reginette (crown-like cups containing various stuffings of seafood, including, in her rendition, scallop and cod) and casonsei (small, Lombardy-style ravioli filled with beef, chard, and raisins). …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Roberto Donna protégé Amy Brandwein brings her talents here from Alba Osteria" See 10/29/2015 Review…»

DBGB Kitchen & Bar

(CityCenterDC)
931 H St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-695-7660

American


 

$$$
$29.77
 

★★½

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
New York-based celebrity chef Daniel Boulud's first area restaurant is this spin-off of his popular restaurant DBGB in the posh CityCenterDC development. Helmed by chef Ed Scarpone, it features a menu that includes sausages and burgers in addition to its modern American appetizers and entrees. However, although similar to the beloved New York original, the spin-off doesn't show the same charm in the dining room or imagination on the plate.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (2/4/2015)
Chef "Ed Scarpone is only 27 years old, but has already spent half a dozen years with [Daniel] Boulud, most recently as executive sous-chef at DB Bistro in New York. The Big Apple’s loss is the District’s gain. Scarpone is putting out some of his best work since he got here. ... Sausage claims a menu category of its own. Link up with at least one house-made selection in the group. ... There’s no finer coq au vin in town right now than Scarpone’s.... The kitchen also grills a steak to rival that of its neighbor, Del Frisco’s Double Eagle. ... Little thoughtfulnesses abound ... bread from no less than ... Mark Furstenberg, whose Bread Furst bakery sells its loaves to only one other restaurateur in town, Fabio Trabocchi." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 37 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Daniel Boulud hasn’t gotten the wild attention that some of his CityCenterDC neighbors have, from either the press (in the case of Momofuku CCDC) or the Department of Health (Fig & Olive). And despite his sterling reputation, the French-born New York chef’s bistro here opened with more of a flicker than a blaze. Turns out it was just taking its time to settle in. The glassy room still feels more tightly controlled than laissez-faire, but that’s a good thing when it comes to the food, which is more confident than ever. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A very expensive bistro, but with sound recipes, tight execution, and thoughtful (if expensive) wines and drinks."

Mango Tree

(CityCenterDC)
929 H St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-408-8100

Thai


 

$$
$24.42
 

★★½

Average Value

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★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Although British born and French trained, chef Paul Kennedy immersed himself in Thai cooking when he took his latest post at Bangkok-based chain. By all accounts, he learned well, earning high marks from the Post's Tom Sietsema when the latest branch opened in DC. Equally well received are the beautiful upstairs dining room, one of the nicest Thai places in the city. Some balk at paying premium prices for Asian food, but the ingredients in Kennedy's version are as lux as at any fine dining restaurant. Some also say the heat is toned down a bit too much, though the restaurant seems to be learning that DC eaters want a more authentic spice.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (2/25/2015)
"Mango Tree is part of a Bangkok-based company, the Mango Tree Group, with 70-plus places to eat around the world, including 11 Mango Trees in eight countries. The Washington outpost ... impresses me with its ability to feel personal despite its size and ambition. ... The best Thai cooking is a dance of sweet, sour, salty and spicy flavors that Mango Tree generally achieves. ... Thirty-six bucks for pad Thai? One of the most expensive dishes on the menu features whole baked lobster ... [and is] enough for two or three to share.... Mango Tree seduces vegetarians ... with a handful of imaginative dishes that take into consideration the brand’s worldwide audience.... Polished food and quality ingredients contribute toward the $26 average for main courses; ginger never substitutes for galangal, and curry leaves never fill in for kaffir lime leaves." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Del Campo

777 I St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-289-7377

Latin American


 

$$$
$26.91
 

★★½

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Smoke and heat are the buzzwords at Victor Albisu's new Latin American restaurant near Chinatown. The menu features an extensive selection of steaks and slow-roasted meats served with vibrant sauces. Nearly everything — even the vegetables — arrives at the table with a smoky char from the wood grill.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/9/2014) — Fall Dining Guide 2014
"[E]verything is grilled, blackened or charred…. There’s lots of smoke…at Del Campo, chef Victor Albisu’s delicious salvo to his Cuban dad and Peruvian mom. Meat, then, dominates the menu of a restaurant that’s dressed to impress with wooden shutters and white-washed floors. Go for lamb stuffed in flaky braided empanadas, chicharones punched up with chilies and spicy peanuts in a riff on pad Thai, and dry-aged rib-eye.&hyellip;Those who have a beef with meat can console themselves with fluffy fried yuca offered with garlic mayonnaise and the Italian-inspired pasqualina tart.…Nothing escapes a brush with fire. Sí, those are grill marks on the carrot cake." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 42 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Some restaurants have a feminine air, all warm hues and soft textures. Some are decidedly masculine—dark dens where business is transacted. Del Campo is a macho preserve. The sensibility is swaggering—the leather-bound menu, the gargantuan steaks, the confident air of the staff. Heck, even the small plates are big. The name refers to the rustic culture that is to Peru and Uruguay what cowboy culture is to America: a mythos, and a culinary world unto itself. The chef, Victor Albisu, doesn’t merely pay homage to that world—he aims to thread its fireside essence through every item on the menu. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse

(CityCenterDC)
950 I St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-289-0201

Steak


 

$$$$$
$51.11
 

★★½

Poor Value

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★★½

Poor Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The last thing DC needed when Del Frisco's Double Eagle opened was ANOTHER steakhouse. Or chain restaurant. This is both, but it wowed Washington Post Critic Tom Sietsema. Don't expect anything but the standard steakhouse script. But if you crave beef -- particularly bone-in cuts -- this is a good choice.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (1/14/2015)
"While entirely predictable, the menu, from a Texas-based chain, revealed glimmers of promise: I ate more of the 22-ounce bone-in rib-eye than I would have imagined..., and admired the careful way with which the kitchen treated sea bass.... Del Frisco’s buys very good meat, some of it scarce prime. Filet mignon is more about texture than taste; anything with a bone, including the fabulous lamb chops, makes my mouth start to water. ... Sides are outsize, and mostly terrific. ... The city might not need Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House, but half a dozen meals since the restaurant’s fall debut have convinced me of this: Bite for bite, the CityCenterDC arrival offers the finest two-fisted dining around." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Daikaya Izakaya

705 Sixth St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-589-1600

Japanese


 

$$
$16.33
 

★★

Good Value

MORE INFO

★★

Good Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The upstairs izakaya at Daikaya features a menu of snacks from chef Katsuya Fukushima. The emphasis here is on fun, tasty food, that pairs well with cocktails, beer, and sake. Yet there's also a fair amount of inventiveness and refinement on the plate, hinting at Fukushima's former job as chef at Jose Andres' Minibar.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/10/2013) — Fall Dining Guide 2013
"Customers order from a menu of fried, grilled, steamed and 'unique' small plates inserted into Japanese fashion magazines; as with Spanish tapas, the food, from Katsuya Fukushima, comes out when it’s ready." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 38 (1/8/2015) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2015
"The ramen craze of the last decade has dovetailed with the pro kitchen’s obsession with everything pig. So you’ll usually find Japanese noodle soups enriched with plenty of porky fat and flavor. Those meaty broths are here, too, in the downstairs ramen shop—and they’re good—but it’s a feat that the kitchen’s vegetarian version, topped with Brussels sprouts, braised mushrooms, and charred bean sprouts, bests them all." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"One visit to Daikaya Izakaya impressed me from start to finish, interesting dishes not found anywhere else." See 4/2/2013 Review…»

Matchbox

713 H Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-289-4441

Pizza
Burgers

 

$
$15.00
 

★★

Good Value

MORE INFO

★★

Good Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The original Chinatown restaurant was called Matchbox because it is in a narrow, tall rowhouse that resembles one standing on its side. That restaurant has since expanded considerably and evolved into a chain with nine locations in four states, plus the District. But the formula and quality remain largely the same, at least as regards the pizzas and best-in-class miniburgers. A handful of entrees are also offered, but these are a bit more expensive than our price estimate and not what you should come here for anyway.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (5/11/2016) — Spring 2016 Dining Guide
"Even though it has expanded from its original three-level location in Chinatown to embrace nearly a dozen same-named restaurants in the District and beyond, Matchbox retains many of its opening-day charms. A wood-stoked pizza oven tips off customers to one draw: thin-crusted pies that whisper of smoke. Servers sport black T-shirts printed with “3-6-9” on them, referencing the several ways you can ask for the signature juicy mini-burgers, heaped with Parmesan-dusted onion strings. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/1/2008)
"… What to get: Plates of mini-burgers—salt-and-peppery Angus patties topped with Gouda and pickles on buttered brioche; a calzonelike crust folded around layers of mozzarella, pepperoni, and spicy meatballs; apple-and-pear salad with Gorgonzola; brick-oven pizzas such as the fire-and-smoke, sausage-and-onion, and Matchbox meat varieties. … " See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Wiseguy NY Pizza

300 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-408-7800

Pizza


 

$
$7.98
 

Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Exceptional Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This slice shop on the edge of Chinatown comes as close in the city as anyone to the New York ideal with flavorful crusts, the right amount of cheese, and slightly crisp crusts that you can still fold (as you should). A second branch is now open in Rosslyn.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (10/23/2014)
"… Like many before him, Wiseguy NY Pizza owner Tony Erol has invested a ton of time and money researching this branch of the pie family. The Turkey native focuses on a several qualities that he believes define true New York pizza: thin, crispy slices, firm at the tip but still foldable; light charring along the exterior crust, far less than the standard leopard spotting of Neapolitan pies; the use of gas-powered deck ovens to spread heat evenly under those thin crusts; and a well-developed dough to provide the right amount of flavor and oven spring. But Erol also believes a New York pizza is a homemade pizza, with almost everything made from scratch…." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/15/2015) — Cheap Eats 2015
"New York–style pizza slices—especially when you get them outside the five boroughs—are often grease bombs, secreting so much orange-colored oil that you need a fresh napkin every few bites. But Wiseguy owner Tony Erol has avoided that, thanks to a near-obsessive drive to get the hallowed pies right. His are made without shortcuts—the kitchen proofs the dough for a full day and pulls fresh mozzarella curds each morning. The fabulous result is a slice more crispy than floppy, with just the right ratio of slightly sweet red sauce to cheese." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"The best NY slice in DC, edging out Tony's for best in the DC Area, eat it right there while it's hot for maximum experience." See 12/31/2015 Review…»

Chop't Creative Salad Company

730 7th Street NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-347-3225

Salads
Wraps
Healthy
 

$
$9.99
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This small salad chain with locations in New York and DC is a great spot for a quick salad or salad wrap. You can make your own combination or select from a number of tasty pre-selected ones. And, with the calories posted on the menu and a good selection of "spa" dressings (all under 50 calories per serving), it's one of our picks for healthy "cheap eats."
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (11/18/2012)
The story about Chop’t highlights some of what we like about it: it’s healthy, fast, has a wide variety of ingredients to choose from, and offers a number of tasty combinations. But that's only half of what caught the reporter's eye. "The other half is the theater that comes with the salad assembly line." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell has not reviewed this restaurant.

Carving Room

300 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-525-2116

Sandwiches
Delicatessen

 

$
$11.63
 

Cheap Eats
Good Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Good Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Oded Weizmann's restaurant is part Jewish deli and part Moroccan restaurant, with a full bar and excellent sandwiches. Try the house made corned beef and pastrami.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

The Washington Post has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (2/27/2013)
"Like many good Jewish delis before it, the 55-seat space is a family operation—but unlike at the delis of yore, you’ll find a bar. … Getting to the meat of the matter (literally), you’ll find plenty of stomach-padding Jewish and Moroccan delicacies. … For heartier helpings of protein, just turn to the sandwiches. House-made corned beef and pastrami star …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"North-African Jewish deli, housemade corned beef and pastrami, cocktails, patio, weekend brunch. one of our top sandwich shops."

Bantam King

501 G St NW
Washington, DC 20003
202-733-2612

Japanese
Ramen

 

$
$12.35
 

Cheap Eats
Good Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Good Value

LESS INFO  

Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
The fast casual ramen shop from Daisuke Utagawa and chef Katsuya Fukushima, the team behind nearby Daikaya, derives its name from the old Burger King it occupies. It offers a small menu of chicken and vegetarian ramen, with a wide assortment of additional toppings. A Japanese-style fried chicken dinner is also available for $24.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (7/15/2016)
"While noodle soup (and not much more) is the specialty at both Daikaya and Bantam King, the latter features pulled chicken ramen, popular in Japan and offered here with a choice of two broths, one milky (paitan) and the other clear (chintan). That selection made, diners then pick a base note: shio, shoyu or miso — salt, soy sauce or fermented soybean paste, respectively. “Think light to heavy,” coaches a server. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/8/2016)
"… His meticulous sourcing is almost ironic given the Burger King themes that pervade the eatery (the space was once home to the fast food chain). Utagawa and co-owners Yama Jewayni and Katsuya Fukushima retained the original ceramic mosaic tile on the floor, lined a wall in fast food-style trays, and dusted up the Persian blue booths. Still you won’t find any patties on the menu, which is solely devoted to all things chicken (“bantam” refers to a small bird), including Japanese soups and fried chicken dinners. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A chicken-ramen shop owned and operated by Daikaya Izakaya and Daikaya Ramen, how can you go wrong here?"
Ratings Guide:
★★★★ Extraordinary;  ★★★ Excellent;  ★★ Good;  ★ Average
All restaurants listed rate above-average or better. DCDiningGuide.com also includes a number of unrated local favorites, casual places, and other restaurants that we recommend if you’re in the neighborhood.
Price Guide:
$$$$$ Unlimited (>$45); $$$$ Very Expensive ($35-$45); $$$ Expensive ($25-$35); $$ Moderate ($15-$25); Inexpensive (<$15)
Price is based on the average cost of a dinner entree, which generally reflects a third of the cost of a full meal. Please note, however, that appetizer and beverage prices vary widely. Tasting menus are indicated with an asterisk (*).