Penn Quarter Restaurants

Rasika

633 D St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-637-1222

Indian


 

$$
$24.00
 

★★★½

Good Value

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★★★½

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Legendary DC restaurateur Ashok Bajaj now boasts two Rasika's. From the beginning, chef Vikram Sunderam has presided over the original in Penn Quarter, which remains the city's best Indian restaurant (and, according to the Washington Post, the best in the country). The "modern Indian" menu marries classic flavors with contemporary techniques to produce dishes that elevate one of the world's most vibrant cuisines to the realm of fine dining. Yet the trendy dining room retains a fairly casual vibe and gentle prices, making it suitable for more than just special occasions. But book early — prime reservations are hard to come by.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
4 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015 [2]
"Ashok Bajaj runs the two best modern Indian restaurants in the country, … Rasika in Penn Quarter and the younger Rasika West End. Poised to turn 10 in December, the original went under the knife in July and emerged $500,000 later with a plusher lounge and a better chance to eavesdrop, thanks to subtle soundproofing in its main dining room. In a contest, Rasika in Penn Quarter wins my appetite and my affection, possibly because we’ve known each other for ages, but definitely because the food, by the masterful Vikram Sunderam, never fails to dazzle me. His duck vindaloo with red coconut rice resonates with vinegar and masala. Broccoli with mustard seeds, ginger and shaved coconut makes for a novel way to eat your greens…[.] Rasika’s breads are the flakiest; its Indian desserts, the most delightful. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 5 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Restaurateur Ashok Bajaj and chef Vikram Sunderam have been repeatedly solicited to bring Rasika to New York and other dining-destination cities. Though Bajaj has no plans to expand outside of DC—he prefers to make daily rounds to his eight restaurants—it’s a testament to how special the Indian restaurant remains ten years into existence, not only in Washington but also on a national stage. Sunderam, who garnered his first James Beard Award in 2014 for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic, continues to helm the kitchens of the Penn Quarter original and younger West End sibling with a consistency and creativity that are rare. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Modern Indian cuisine served in vibrant, modern settings; ambitious recipes, a recent meal was superb, even the paratha and raita, get the tandoori trout. The new location is a tough reservation, but you can often find a seat at the bar."

Minibar by Jose Andres

855 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-393-0812

Modern


 

$$$$$
$250.00*
 

★★★½

Poor Value

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★★★½

Poor Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Although Minibar got off to a rough start in its new stand-alone space, it quickly regained it’s old form and four-star rating. At $250 per person (plus drinks, tax, and tip), Jose Andres' modernist experience is the most expensive restaurant in DC. Dinner involves 20-30 courses—most just a bite—designed to challenge the diner to think about food in new ways. Fortunately, chefs Ruben García and Aitor Lozano (both alumnae of el Bullí), also know how to make food that's delicious. The end result is a dining experience unlike any other in DC, and one of the most difficult reservations in the country to get.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
4 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015
"Fasten your seat belts. It’s going to be a jumpy night. No two deliveries are ever the same at Minibar, the intimate restaurant from José Andrés that adds up to a comedy show, a science demonstration and one of the most original dinners staged in this country. Over the course of a few hours, everything you think you know about food is likely to be challenged. … Seriously. In lesser hands, Minibar might be an expensive gimmick. As served by Andrés and company, it’s a taste of the future in real time." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 22 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"José Andrés’s dining experience is both the most expensive dinner in DC ($275 a pop just for food) and probably the coolest science class you’ve ever been to. At a bar-for-12 fronting a bustling kitchen, you’ll not only eat your way through a set menu of 25 to 30 surrealist courses; you’ll learn how each is made—how, say, a corkscrew, a syringe, gelatin, and liquid nitrogen can create a knockout fusilli with pesto. Many dishes in the lineup these days are more about brow-raising wizardry than deliciousness—get ready for a lot of gelatinous textures—and the whole production feels more rushed than it has in years past. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"I haven't been to the new Minibar (at $250 prix fixe, I can't afford it!), but based on the old version, this is surely a special experience."

Fiola

601 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-628-2888

Italian


 

$$$$$
$47.20
 

★★★½

Average Value

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★★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Fabio Trabocchi's upscale Italian restaurant was originally supposed to be a more casual, less expensive version of his former four-star Maestro, which closed several years ago. Over time, it has evolved into a very expensive restaurant, with intricate, luxurious dishes. The results are worth the price of admission, though those looking to try Trabocchi's cooking at less lofty prices should head to sister-restaurant Casa Luca, where the original casual theme lives on.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3.5 Stars (5/11/2016) — Spring 2016 Dining Guide
"Chef Fabio Trabocchi’s biggest competitor is himself. When it comes to haute Italian cooking in Washington, there’s Fiola Mare in Georgetown and his original Fiola in Penn Quarter. For a few years now, I’ve been talking up the former. But guess what? Senior is out-cooking junior right now, the evidence arriving with a treat from the kitchen that’s as much architecture as “benvenuto”: a candle-lit tower supporting a delicate cup of warm prosecco zabaglione and gingery oysters, the richness of the frothy custard cut with lemon zest. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 23 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Fabio Trabocchi’s Penn Quarter flagship may not grab the same attention these days as its seafood-minded Georgetown sister, Fiola Mare (number one on our list this year). Still, it remains a power-dining paragon. Pastas are lovely across the board, whether delicate ravioli stuffed with lobster or pappardelle with deeply flavorful wild-boar ragu. As at Fiola Mare, fish is handled particularly well. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Excellent but heavy cuisine, genuinely caring staff, thoughtful beverage program, fine bar albeit with some key staff turnover, Fiola has become extraordinarily expensive, perhaps too expensive, for its own long-term good." See 6/23/2011 Review…»

Central Michel Richard

1001 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-626-0015

American


 

$$$
$26.87
 

★★★

Good Value

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★★★

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Michel Richard's bistro is still going strong after six years. The menu features Richard's takes on American and French comfort food and includes one of the best burgers in DC (albeit an expensive one) and some great fried chicken. The bar program is also top notch, with some great, long-time bartenders.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/21/2012) — 2012 Fall Dining Guide
"The food in the convivial bistro, from the delicate gougeres to the robust cioppino, now has a clarity and finesse it has not had in years. I applaud the kitchen’s playfulness; a summertime appetizer of cubed tuna and watermelon not only lands beautifully on the tongue, the eyes are fooled into seeing surf as turf and vice versa. And I appreciate Central’s lunch-to-go menu; sticking by your desk is easier when there’s a bag with a lobster burger nearby. Thin saucers of chicken schnitzel sparkle with lemon and capers; short ribs lack crust, but the roseate bars exemplify home cooking translated by a master chef." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 19 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"Michel Richard is one of the most important chefs ever to run a kitchen in this city—or, for that matter, this country. But scan the menu at this warm-toned roost and what jumps out? The burgers, fries, and fried chicken—yes, the junk food among the honor roll of bistro classics. If you have a discerning eye, you’ll understand the process that went into them, but the marvelous thing about Richard’s cooking—as rendered by protégé David Deshaies—is that you don’t need to: These are complex dishes that taste simple. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"This once-good restaurant may be on a downswing, current reports are of pared-down menus, raised prices, and poor execution." See 3/9/2011 Review…»

Jaleo

480 7th St NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-628-7949

Spanish


 

$$
$25.00
 

★★★

Good Value

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★★★

Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Jose Andres's original downtown Jaleo, which opened in 1993, remains the best. With a recent makeover, it truly lives up to the name, which means "revelry, fun, and bustle." The modern tapas menu also features authentic Spanish ham and a selection of excellent paellas. Some of these offerings can be expensive, so be careful in ordering or you could end up with a hefty check.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/7/2015) — Fall Dining Guide 2015
"No D.C. restaurant fits its name better than Jaleo, which a sound check would translate as 'Party!' and which still serves the finest tapas I’ve had outside Spain. Behold the glass-paved foosball tables, and bring on the salt cod fritters! From the bar comes a show-stopping, minty-fresh gin and tonic, and from the kitchen come little somethings for appetites of all persuasions, everything beautifully presented. … If you can’t ID something to like from the lot, you’re being impossible. Evenings find paellas, plus desserts that venture beyond flan to include chewy olive oil ice cream on pink grapefruit.…" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 26 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"We take Jaleo for granted. We do. Chew on this for a second: Jaleo has been around almost a quarter century. And how about this? The small-plates craze that you’ve maybe grown tired of but can’t possibly ignore? Jaleo birthed it. But the Dorian Gray of restaurants is still youthful and lively, with a menu that evolves in exciting ways. If you haven’t been in years, you’ll find an excellent selection of Spanish hams (including Ibérico, the ultimate in depth of flavor), along with several shiny new baubles …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

The Partisan

709 D Street NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-524-5322

American


 

$$$
$25.25
 

★★½

Average Value

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★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Neighborhood Restaurant Group's newest outpost is a ode to meat from the adjoining Red Apron Butchery. Chef Ed Witt and charcuterie wizard Nathan Anda offer a sushi-style charcuterie checklist that allows diners to select among the 30 cured meats, and a main menu of small plates divided not by appetizers and entrees, but by animal species. Excellent cocktails from mixologist Jeff Faile, 50 bottles and 17 drafts chosen by beer maven Greg Engert, and a versatile wine list from wine director Brent Kroll round out the package.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (9/30/2014) — Fall Dining Guide 2014 [8]
"The charcuterie list features more than 30 choices, from blood sausage to wild boar pâté.…Should you need another nudge to eat meat here, consider this: Nathan Anda, the chef who raised the bar for butcher shops with the Red Apron brand, is also a partner in Partisan.…[S]tart with a cocktail…while you wait for a board of sausages…. With the plank of protein comes a rack of terrific tigelles (think English muffins, only thinner and brushed with lard). Go easy on the bread, though, because you’ll want to save space for small plates of sliced bavette (outside skirt steak)…and whiskey-kissed lamb ribs…. No one-trick pony, executive chef Ed Witt treats vegetables, pasta, fish and fowl with the same care he expends on beef and pork." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 82 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"The menu says 'serves 4 to 6,' but what’s a number when you and a pal are bent on getting the pig feast this dining room is known for? Roasted pig’s head, sausage, smoked bone marrow, pig-ear salad—it’s all part of the bacchanal. (Just take home lots of leftovers.) Still, there are plenty of other ways to partake in the meaty thrills. Dabble in Nathan Anda’s charcuterie menu—we go for the bacon liverwurst, Negroni-inspired salami, and beef heart with bourbon-soaked peppercorns. Or head for bigger plates such as mezcal-braised lamb ribs and pork-shank confit. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"Yet another opening from NRG featuring talented chefs Nathan Anda and Ed Witt, great beers and the best charcuterie of any restaurant in the area."

Oyamel

401 Seventh St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-628-1005

Mexican


 

$$
$25.00
 

★★½

Average Value

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★★½

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Jose Andres' small plates Mexican concept is a far cry from the typical Tex-Mex joints that most people are familiar with. The menu from Chef Colin King includes high-end renditions of classic ceviches, tacos (including one made with chapulines — grasshoppers), and regional specialties like Mole Poblano. There are also excellent cocktails, including a margarita with salty foam in place of the usual rim, and a selection of Mexican wines not found anywhere else. All of it is served in a recently-expanded space with a fun atmosphere and Andres' signature style.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2.5 Stars (10/9/2014) — Fall Dining Guide 2014
"Named for the fir trees in Mexico that sustain monarchs in winter, the Penn Quarter retreat is one of multiple small-plates restaurants from the globe-trotting José Andrés and a rare source of memorable Mexican cooking in Washington.…I almost squeal when I take a bite of the taco filled with soft baby pig, crisp pork rinds and green tomatillo sauce. (Fried grasshopper tacos, on the other hand, are proof that if you fry something in enough garlic, it’s going to be at least decent.) Hominy and shredded pork in a brick-red broth is a strapping good time that becomes a major party with the addition of lime, radishes and cabbage. Proceed with abandon." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (2/1/2009)
"Mexican regional cooking gets the José Andrés treatment. Translation: playful little plates known as antojitos, full of fire and crunch. House-made salsas and tortillas elevate the experience but not the prices." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

701

701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-393-0701

American


 

$$
$21.13
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
After a period of turnover in the kitchen, Ashok Bajaj recently hired Benjamin Lambert as Executive Chef at this long-running Pennsylvania Avenue restaurant. Under the new chef, 701 is becoming an even stronger and more consistent restaurant. Lambert's modern American menu has enough good choices to suit most tastes and the upscale atmosphere is sure to leave a good impression, making this a good choice for just about any occasion.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (8/13/2014)
"In February, Benjamin Lambert, an alumnus of Restaurant Nora, took over the kitchen reins. … Almost every appetizer contains a little wonder. … The kitchen is happy to oblige half-portions of its pastas[.] … It would be easy to request another half-portion for an entree, but that would mean missing some of the magnets among the main courses." [UPDATE] See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (1/25/2013) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2013
Washingtonian likes "this jazz-playing power dining room" where "the Oval Room’s Tony Conte" has "cleaned up … accompaniments while tweaking entrées and appetizers." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A large restaurant with an upscale atmosphere, a great menu, and a good beverage program, recent chef change."

China Chilcano

418 7th St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-783-0941

Peruvian


 

$$
$22.83
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Jose Andres latest small plates restaurant specializes in Peruvian cuisine, specifically the county's native Criollo, Chinese Chifa, and Japanese Nikkei cuisines. In most dishes, the Asian influence dominates, and many would be familiar to lovers of dumplings or sushi. The South American influence is represented in the ceviches and salsa, among other tradition dishes, but also shows up in a few "fusion" dishes that marry the cuisines.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (4/6/2015)
"Here the Andrés team focuses on Peru.... But Peruvian food isn’t just char-grilled chickens, ceviches, and tiraditos. It’s also chifa, the Chinese-accented stir-fries and fried rices that evolved after a wave of Chinese immigrants settled in Peru in the late 19th century. And it’s nikkei, which includes the raw fish dishes that resulted from the Japanese diaspora. ... Thus a table here can be crammed with a dim-sum-like array of dumplings plus hearty stews and delicate bites of sushi. It doesn’t help that portions are unpredictable—ceviches tend to be more bountiful and filling than, for example, lamb pot stickers or fried shrimp-and-pork dumplings.... But the thing to remember is that the most rewarding dishes bear Asian accents." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
No. 71 (2/8/2016) — 100 Very Best Restaurants 2016
"José Andrés mines the cuisine of Peru, one of South America’s richest culinary plains, at this loud, flashbulb-bright dining room strewn with colorful pillows. As at pretty much every other place in José world, dishes have been distilled into small plates and are set off with inventive cocktails (try the Inca Sunrise, with rum, passionfruit, and muddled tomato). The menu can be tricky to navigate—it throws together Peruvian standards such as lomo saltado with dishes that bear a heavy Chinese or Japanese influence. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Barmini

855 E St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-393-4451

Modern
Cocktail Bar

 

$$
$25.00
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Jose Andres' Barmini is the cocktail equivalent of his culinary temple, Minibar, located next door. The gorgeous white space resembles a kitchen and features an epic menu of classic and modern cocktails. The food — a selection of small plates — is every bit as good as the drinks and features the same inventive style as its uber-expensive sibling at a fraction of the cost.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
3 Stars (10/10/2013) — Fall Dining Guide 2013
"If you want a taste of tomorrow today, reserve a seat at Barmini, the futuristic lounge adjoining Minibar, the daring dinner theater from Spanish ambassador Jose Andres. Barmini is the playground of "cocktail innovator" Juan Coronado and home to some of the most fascinating liquids this city has ever sipped." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

Washingtonian has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"A beautiful sea of white, featuring outstanding cocktails and “bar snacks” nearly their equal, very much Minibar 'in spirit.'"

Cedar

822 E St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-637-0012

American


 

$$$
$26.80
 

★★

Average Value

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★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Cedar recently lost long-time chef Aaron McCloud, but it's still a good choice for seasonal American cooking.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/17/2009)
An outdated First Bite from Tom Sietsema. See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (1/1/2010)
Washingtonian notes that "chef Andrew Kitko’s Modern American menu offers just a handful of appetizers and entrées, forgoing the chance to dazzle diners with elaborate dish descriptions and instead emphasizing his commitment to execution." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"The "sleeper" restaurant in Penn Quarter, Cedar deserves more recognition than it gets, seasonal cooking that integrates vegetables very nicely."

Tadich Grill

1001 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-638-1849

Seafood


 

$$$
$28.25
 

★★

Average Value

MORE INFO

★★

Average Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
San Francisco's famed Tadich Grill opened its first ever spin-off in DC's Penn Quarter. Remarkably, although about twice the size of the original, it gets enough of the details right to channel the look and feel of the real thing. The menu is massive, with just about every seafood combo you could want. But, though the average price of an entree is relatively low, it can get very pricey, very quickly.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
2 Stars (11/25/2015)
"… Let me say upfront: Initially, I wasn’t thrilled with the idea of a second Tadich. Sacred subjects are rarely improved in a retelling. … Yet my initial visit to the corner of 10th and Pennsylvania turned out to be a pleasant surprise. While twice the size of the original, the 170-seat spinoff nails many of the details that make the senior establishment special: cozy booths enclosed with walls of wood, Hangtown fry and sand dabs on the menu, waiters who take what they do — but not themselves — seriously. Deviating from tradition, the Washington branch accepts reservations. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (10/7/2015)
"… Tadich co-owners Steve and Michael Buich—whose family members have worked at the flagship since 1912—partnered with Icon, a Seattle-based company that specializes in expanding legendary restaurants; the group is also behidn DC’s Joe’s Seafood, Prime Steak & Stone Crab. Though the idea was never to duplicate Tadich—impossible given its history—the team hopes to capture what’s made it a special place for over a century. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Protein Bar

398 7th St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-621-9574

Wraps
Salads
Healthy
 

$
$9.99
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This fast-casual chain from Chicago focuses on healthier, lower calorie food that still manages to be tastier than the high-fat, high calorie meals it aims to replace. The menu includes wraps (called "bar-ritos" here), salads, and quinoa bowls, all at around 500 calories (most are less). It's one of our choices for healthy cheap eats.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (9/26/2012)
"Protein Bar … aims to give the lunchtime crowd a more healthful alternative with its Bar-ritos, which contain half the fat and less than half the calories." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (6/13/2013)
"Breakfast options include quinoa bowls and oatmeal, while lunch involves “grilled” and “chilled” protein bar-ritos, salads, and more quinoa bowls[.] … You can also pick food and shakes up for dinner; Protein Bar keeps the lights on until 8 PM." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.

Teaism

400 8th Street NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-638-6010

Asian


 

$
$10.70
 

Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Cheap Eats
Excellent Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
These Asian-inspired tea houses feature simple, good food and small selection of beer and wine alongside an extensive menu of teas. Don't miss the salted oat cookies, easily worth purchasing a whole bag.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (11/30/2008)
An outdated review of Teaism's breakfast, but we still agree with its recommendation of "scrambled eggs with tea-smoked salmon or chicken sausage with nan and raita." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (12/14/2009)
This outdated review still holds true: "the food is fast, healthy, cheap, and tasty," featuring eclectic "Bento Boxes" at lunch and, of course, tea. And definitely "don't forget those salty oat cookies." See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Italic — Recommended
"These tea houses are treasures, the food is simple and good, try the salted oat cookie with your tea."

Red Apron Butchery

709 D St NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-524-5244

Sandwiches


 

$
$12.35
 

Cheap Eats
Good Value

MORE INFO

Cheap Eats
Good Value

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Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
This butcher shop from Neighborhood Restaurant Group (the team behind Birch & Barley, Vermillion, and others), now has three locations. Both feature sandwiches, burgers, and sausages from charcuterie master Nate Anda.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 

The Washington Post has not reviewed this restaurant.
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
Unrated (5/5/2016) — Cheap Eats 2016
"You likely know the Neighborhood Restaurant Group’s trio of butcher shops for their humanely raised meats, vast array of house-made charcuterie, and gut-busting sandwiches. All good things. But Red Apron should get just as much attention for its fried chicken—even at a time when chefs all around town are obsessing over crispy birds. …" See Full Review…»
Summary
Washington Post
Washingtonian
Don Rockwell
 
 
Don Rockwell does not recommend this restaurant.
Ratings Guide:
★★★★ Extraordinary;  ★★★ Excellent;  ★★ Good;  ★ Average
All restaurants listed rate above-average or better. DCDiningGuide.com also includes a number of unrated local favorites, casual places, and other restaurants that we recommend if you’re in the neighborhood.
Price Guide:
$$$$$ Unlimited (>$45); $$$$ Very Expensive ($35-$45); $$$ Expensive ($25-$35); $$ Moderate ($15-$25); Inexpensive (<$15)
Price is based on the average cost of a dinner entree, which generally reflects a third of the cost of a full meal. Please note, however, that appetizer and beverage prices vary widely. Tasting menus are indicated with an asterisk (*).